The Talos Principle: An Extension of Humanity

In ancient Greek mythos, a man made of bronze was forged to protect Princess Europa on the island of Crete. Named Talos, he exhibited all the behaviors of a human, though he was not made of flesh and blood. Composed differently, would you still consider him to be a conscious, living being?

The Talos Principle is a first-person puzzle platformer that raised this very question, guiding players to the possibilities of what it means to be human. Not only does it force you to rationalize, it allows you to consider your own belief system or convince you otherwise.

This is still just a game, but it could change your life.

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Are Violent Video Games Linked to Aggression?

As long as video games have been around, parents and government officials have raised multiple concerns on whether video games are too violent. After certain mass shootings, such as Columbine and other more recent incidents, similar questions were raised as well. Are video games linked to aggression and violent behavior in these recurring incidents?

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Journalistic Work Ethic Translated into Life-Long Passion for Gaming

The main credo in journalism is objectivism. As a journalist, I tend to follow that. As a science reporter, I am especially critical of research and methodology, as those too must be objective and free of conflict of interest. As a gamer, I approach all games with an open mind and forethought of the industry. It is somewhat hard to describe one's self as an "objective gamer," but I do play a wide variety of games. And if I were to tear down my journalistic walls for just a second, I would say I love games. I love all kinds of games. I would love to be paid to play games and express my own opinion through writing. The fact that these jobs exist means something important to both the game and reporting industries.

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Covering Health for Specific Ethnic Minority Groups

One of the most important topics that really force people to take action are health-related stories. Although people generally don't take care of themselves these days due to fast-paced lifestyles, when issues do occur they look for answers. In Understanding Ethnic Media: Producers, Consumers and Societies, Matthew Matsaganis often noted the importance of ethnic media in regards to helping people not accustomed to American systems become more aware. He mentions voting and becoming socially active, which immigrants have a hard time getting into when they first move here.

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Unifying the North and South

In their July/August issue, Foreign Affairs published an analysis of possible reunification of North and South Korea. Ever since Kim Il Sung took power of North Korea in 1948, other nations predicted failure for the country. Over time, the United States, South Korea, Japan and China have closely watched the weak nation and saw the tenacity of its leaders. Kim Jong Il, the second heir, ruled with an iron fist since 1994 until he died in 2011, and then his son, Kim Jong Un took over. This reign for 66 years has lasted longer than most officials believed because much of its history has shown an unstable economy, yet it still thrives.

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Working in Ethnic Media

In the past few weeks, I've been looking into what it's like to be an ethnic media reporter. I've been speaking with journalists and different ethnic groups to see what kind of stories need to be covered in these small pockets of communities. I wrote a profile on one journalist, Julie Ha, who is currently a contributing editor for the KoreAm Journal based in Gardena, Calif. The magazine originated in Los Angeles and was founded by James Ryu, who is the publisher, along with a sister publication called Audrey Magazine, that focuses on Asian American women.

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North Korea and Why We've become Desensitized

A couple weeks ago, I had seen a heartbreaking and inspiring speech by Yeonmi Park at the One Young World Summit. Park is a defector of North Korea and fled the regime with her mother when she was 13 years old. Now 21, Park spoke openly about her struggles living and fleeing North Korea and what she wants to do to help others who are suffering the way she did.

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The American Melting Pot & Interracial Couples

Different ethnic groups living in the United States slowly gained acceptance from Americans who had racial intolerance simmering in their families for generations. Interracial dating and marriage was a bit slow to gain acceptance and can even be frowned upon by older generations of many ethnicities across the board today. By the 21st century, the average couple was no longer representing one ethnicity. Now, more families represent the melting pot, but it has become a literal mixture of people.

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Best Way to be Introduced to a New Culture? Eat the Food

When people ask me what it's like to be Indian or to describe what traditions I follow, I take them out to an Indian restaurant or I let them eat a home-cooked meal made by my mother.

To be open-minded and willing to try a foreign dish is one of the most humbling and benign ways to be introduced to a culture. The practice of cooking and preparing a meal can really say a lot about what that culture values and what they may bring to American culture.

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A Peek into Eastern Pop Culture: Idols, Pop Music & Selling your Soul

Pop music has dominated the Western world as early as the 1980s and captivates global audiences of varying demographics. Annually, we see the top 40 charts, and most of those "hits" are American pop songs. In 2012, the Korean rapper, Psy, came out with his hit single Gangnam Style, which became the most viewed video on YouTube and made it to said charts. Literally, everywhere you went, everyone knew that song and the iconic saddle dance. Music in Japan and South Korea have grown in popularity in the last five years, and they're finally reaching Western societies through social media and "idols" that have unique characteristics and stage performance.

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"Growing Audience Through Engaging Communities" and What I Learned from the ASNE/APME Conference

The American Society of Newspaper Editors and Associated Press Media Editors conference was held September 15 to the 17 in Chicago this year, and I was lucky enough to attend the second day of the conference. I took the time to view some of the presentations in the early afternoon, and it was an encouraging experience.

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Interesting Stories about the Far East

I spend a great deal of time on social media catching up on what's happening in the world rather than socializing with others. This week, on Twitter, I found two compelling stories - one about South Korea and the other on Japan - that discuss culture and how these aspects of tradition are affecting modern lifestyles.

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